Environment

Two Different Washington State Employment Snapshots from King, Mason Counties

The port, Foss and Shell find themselves in a toxic stew of sentiments. There’s also a prevailing attitude, at least in officialdom, that the jobs generated at a place such as the port and by activities such as hosting an oil-drilling fleet, not to mention the people likely to fill such jobs, are increasingly unnecessary in the municipal vision of Seattle’s future.

U.S. Will Pay Dearly for Obama’s Anti-Carbon Crusade

The cost of residential electricity in the EU has soared 43 percent since 2006, while in the U.S. rates are only up 17 percent; customers in Europe spend more than twice as much as their American counterparts. That’s what the U.S. has to look forward to. Germany’s energy policies are so mixed up that in spite of huge investments in renewables and onerous efficiency mandates, carbon emissions in Germany have risen 5 percent-7 percent over the past two years.

Shell and High Water: The Climate Battle of Seattle

Few of us would consciously choose the future we’ll get if we allow continuing expansion of fossil-fuel development — a future of unthinkable human suffering caused by climate chaos and unchecked domination of our democratic institutions by fossil-fuel interests. As the mayor said, “It’s time to turn the page. Things like oil trains and coal trains and oil-drilling rigs are the past. It’s time to focus on the economy of the future.”

Three Climate Messages That Win

Breakthrough Strategies & Solutions (along with Sightline and a team of messaging experts) has retested and updated the powerful climate change narrative first developed in 2012 that informed high-profile climate communications from the White House to local leaders across the US. It’s a clear, compelling narrative that cuts through these coal and oil industry tactics and frames global warming and energy solutions on our terms, not theirs.

With an Eye on Labor, Seattle City Council Goes Green

When members of a city council committee unanimously passed a resolution Tuesday condemning the Port of Seattle’s two-year lease to host Arctic oil drilling equipment, Shell Oil was not in the room. As a result, Seattle council members were forced to defend their condemnation not to the multi-national fossil fuel producer, but to angry people they still clearly respect: Seattle’s working class.

Shellfish Growers Frustrated as Ecology Cancels Pesticide Permit

Ecology officials said the decision to block the use of the pesticide was made after hearing from residents across Washington that the practice did not meet their expectations. Ecology spokesman Chase Gallagher said the objections from residents weren’t specific to the use of imidacloprid, but to the use of pesticides in general.

Mayor: Port Needs New Permit to Host Shell Oil-Drilling Fleet

“The mayor’s action … raises grave concerns about his stated commitment to Seattle’s thriving maritime community,” A spokesman for Foss added in a written statement. “By giving a small but vocal group the ability to jeopardize the commercial relationships between our local maritime businesses and the Port of Seattle, the mayor is casting serious doubt on the future of the city’s working waterfront.”